Birobidzhan -1st autonomous -1934-why Palestine-Greater Israel??

Welcome to our new OurBeacon Forum!
Post Reply
abdalazizariff
Posts: 36
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2021 5:51 pm
Contact:

Birobidzhan -1st autonomous -1934-why Palestine-Greater Israel??

Post by abdalazizariff »

Birobidzhan (Russian: Биробиджа́н, IPA: [bʲɪrəbʲɪˈdʐan]; Yiddish: ביראָבידזשאַן‎, Birobidzhan) is a town and the administrative center of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast, Russia, located on the Trans-Siberian Railway, near the China-Russia border. As of the 2010 Census, its population is 75,413, and its official language is Yiddish.[6] Birobidzhan is named after the two largest rivers in the autonomous oblast: the Bira and the Bidzhan [ru]. The Bira, which lies to the east of the Bidzhan Valley,[16] flows through the town. Both rivers are tributaries of the Amur.


Birobidzhan was planned by the Swiss architect Hannes Meyer, and established in 1931. It became the administrative center of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast in 1934, and town status was granted to it in 1937.[2] The 36,000 km2 of Birobidzhan were approved by the Politburo on March 28, 1928.[17] After the Bolshevik revolution, the Soviet Union contained two organizations that worked with the Jews settling into Birobidzhan, the KOMZET and OZET.[18] The organizations were responsible for distribution of land as well as domestic responsibilities, ranging from moving to medical assistance. Many Jewish Canadians then gave their support to the Soviet Union by becoming either members or sympathizers with the Communist Party of Canada.[18] The Jewish communists believed that the Soviet Union's creation of Birobidzhan was the "only true and sensible solution to the national question."[18] The Soviet government used the slogan "To the Jewish Homeland!" to encourage Jewish workers to move to Birobidzhan. The slogan proved successful in convincing Soviet Jews as well as Jews from other countries.[19] In 1935, Ambijan received permission from the Soviet government to aid Jewish families traveling to Birobidzhan from Poland, Romania, Lithuania and Germany.[20] Jewish workers and engineers traveled to Birobidzhan from Argentina and the United States as well.[19] This campaign by the Soviet government was known as the Birobidzhan Experiment.[21]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birobidzhan


Zionism: 100 years of the Balfour Declaration
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdGxFWjKdyo
Post Reply